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Huge ancient baths unearthed in Greece’s lost city of Tenea

New excavations at the ancient city of Tenea have unearthed amazing new finds, including a massive bath, the Greek government announced this week.

Archaeologists uncovered a complex of bathing facilities, roughly 5,382 square feet in total, dating from between the end of the third century BC to the mid-1st century BC, according to a report in Tornos News.

The bath areas reportedly once had heated water; two of them end in arches and have clay floors that are well-preserved, and some floors still have paint on them.

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Large baths dating from the Roman times were discovered. (Greek Ministry of Culture)

Archaeologists also found an ancient well reaching a depth of 49 feet to the north of the baths, along with some smaller objects that were likely ceremonial offerings.

Tornos News reports that the city of Tenea was founded by the Trojans in approximately 1100 BC and the buildings were built by prisoners of war.

The news outlet reports that the ancient legend of Oedipus, the mythical king of Thebes, mentions the existence of Tenea.

Columns found in the bathing area of Tenea. (Greek Ministry of Culture)

Tenea itself is part of the Peloponnese region of Greece.

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SOURCE : https://www.foxnews.com/science/ancient-baths-unearthed-greeces-tenea

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